Low-Cost Cybersecurity Tips

Hacks and ransomware crimes are all over the news headlines. Seems like there’s a new one reported every day. Victims include federal government agencies, insurance companies, energy infrastructure, and computer system vendors. Those are some highly sophisticated players that have invested tons of money in cybersecurity. So, what chance does a small business have defending itself against all those sophisticated cybercriminals? 

Bottom line, the tons of money that organizations invest in cybersecurity can go right out the window if the users – ordinary and fallible people – don’t follow safe system security practices. Systems are only as safe as the security knowledge and practices of the least knowledgeable system user. All it takes to open the door to a cybercriminal is one person clicking on the wrong link from an unknown source, or from a hacker masquerading as a trusted sender.

Believe it or not, periodic reminders of these low-cost cybersecurity tips will help organizations of all sizes and types to follow safe cybersecurity practices:

  1. Keep software systems up to date and use a good anti-virus program.
  1. Examine the email address and URLs in all correspondence to detect a scammer mimicking a legitimate site or email address.
  1. Ignore text messages, emails, or phone calls asking you to update or verify your account information and go to the company’s website to see if something needs your attention.
  1. Never open unexpected attachments until verifying the sender’s email address and use virus scan before opening any document.
  1. Scrutinize all electronic requests for a payment or fund transfers.
  1. Be extra suspicious of any message that urges immediate action.

Human action is a risk that can throw an organization’s cybersecurity investment right out the window. People who click before thinking can allow hackers in to do all sorts of expensive and embarrassing damage. By promoting a few low-cost cybersecurity tips, business or all sizes and types can avoid becoming a victim of sophisticated hackers and other cybercriminals.