Expanded Educator Deduction for COVID-19 Safety

The educator deduction for out-of-pocket classroom expenses started as a temporary tax law provision in 2002. Primary and secondary schoolteachers could deduct up to $250 of the unreimbursed cost of books, supplies, computer equipment, and supplementary materials used in the classroom. In 2015, the deduction was made permanent. In 2016, the deduction was expanded to cover professional development expenses and was indexed for inflation.

Even with indexing for inflation and before the pandemic, $250+ a year did not put much of a dent in teacher spending. COVID-19 safety needs have made classroom expenses spike, just like other work environments. In June 2020, AdoptAClassroom.org surveyed U.S. educators to ask about classroom expenses during distance learning. It was not shocking to learn that teachers spent an average of $745 for classroom supplies in the 2019-20 school year. Almost half of the responding teachers reported spending more because of distance learning. 

The COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020 expanded the educator deduction further to help teachers afford the challenges of distance learning and returning to the classroom. Here’s what you need to know about the expanded educator deduction:

  • Who is Eligible for the Deduction?

You’re an eligible educator if, for the tax year you’re a kindergarten through grade 12 teacher, instructor, counselor, principal, or aide for at least 900 hours during the school year. Services must be performed in a school that provides elementary or secondary education as determined under state law.

  • What Safety Items Qualify?

COVID-19 protective items include, but are not limited to face masks, disinfectant, hand soap and sanitizer, disposable gloves, physical barriers like clear plexiglass, air purifiers, and other items recommended the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the prevention of the spread of COVID-19.

  • When Can Safety Items be Included?

Qualified expenses include the amounts that you pay or incur after March 12, 2020, for personal protective equipment, disinfectant, and other supplies used for the prevention of the spread of coronavirus. The deduction is for expenses paid or incurred during 2020 are deductible on your 2020 federal tax return.

Still not sure if you or someone that you know is eligible for the expanded educator deduction for COVID-19 safety items? Read more details at https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc458.

IRS Expands Identity Theft Protection Program

Identity theft has existed for almost as long we we’ve had identities. Back in the Old Days, identity theft involved paper and the U.S. mail. The Internet and other online tools made identity theft faster and more wide-spread. Several year ago, when scammers hit taxpayers hard by stealing their IDs and filing fraudulent tax returns, the IRS reacted by starting an Identity Protection Program. Taxpayers who report an identity theft issue are issued an Identity Protection Personal Identification Number (IP-PIN) for filing her or his federal tax return.

With identity theft getting worse all the time, the IRS is rolling out a voluntary nation-wide IP-PIN Program for taxpayers to get identity theft protection before falling victim to an identity thief. After several years of piloting the program in different parts of the country to make sure it works as intended, the IRS is expanding the program nation-wide effective now.

How does the IP-PIN Program work? Here are six things you need to know:

  • The (IP PIN) is a six-digit code known only to the taxpayer and to the IRS. It helps prevent identity thieves from filing fraudulent tax returns using a taxpayers’ personally identifiable information.
  • Once issued by the IRS, the taxpayer’s tax account is locked, and the IP PIN serves as the key to opening that account. Electronically-filed federal income tax returns that do not contain the correct IP PIN will be rejected. A paper return must be filed. That return will go through additional scrutiny for fraud.
  • An IP PIN is valid for one specific calendar year. A new IP PIN must be obtained for each filing season.
  • This is a voluntary program. Taxpayers who want IRS assistance with identity theft protection must pass a rigorous identity verification process. Spouses and dependents are eligible for an IP PIN if she or he can also pass the identity verification process.
  • Current tax-related identity theft victims who have been receiving IP PINs via mail will experience no change.
  • There is no opt-out option. The IRS is working on it for 2022. Taxpayers who cannot provide an IP PIN or obtain a replacement can’t unlock her or his tax account and must file the return in paper form. Any refund will take several weeks to process.

The IRS IP-PIN Program is one option taxpayers can use to protect her or his identity from theft and fraudulent tax filings. For taxpayers that do want to use the program, the IRS offers more information and instructions here – https://www.irs.gov/identity-theft-fraud-scams/get-an-identity-protection-pin.

Taxes and Your Subchapter S Corporation

Whenever I get a “run” of client calls about a specific topic, I assume that the Tax Universe is telling me to blog about it. Lately, that topic has been the tax rules for business owners who have elected to operate as a Subchapter S Corporation (Sub S). Business owners often form an LLC to protect their personal assets. An LLC can be operated for tax purposes in one of several ways, including the election to operate for tax purposes as a Sub S. That election has some advantages, but it adds more complexity as well.

If your business operates for tax purposes as a Sub S, or you are thinking about forming one, here are a few things to know:

  • Qualification – To qualify for Sub S status, the business must be a corporation that has between one and 100 shareholders who are domestic individuals, certain trusts, or estates. A Sub S can only have one class of stock. The corporation must have legal formation documents, an operating agreement, a separate tax ID, and documented shareholder meetings. 
  • Avoid Double Taxation – Sub S Corporations pass corporate income, losses, deductions, and credits through to their shareholders for tax purposes. However, there are a few exceptions when a Sub S is responsible for tax, such as built-in gains and passive income. Shareholders of a Sub S report their pro rata share of income and losses on their personal tax returns, subject to tax at the shareholder’s individual income tax rates. 
  • Shareholder Compensation – Sub S Corporations must pay reasonable compensation in the form of wages to a shareholder-employee if that the employee provides services to the corporation. Wages are reported on a W-2 and are subject to employment taxes. Net profits or losses from operations are reported on a Form K-1 and treated as non-wage distributions, which are not subject to employment taxes. 
  • Limited Losses – The fact that a shareholder receives a K-1 reflecting a loss does not mean that the shareholder is automatically entitled to deduct the loss. She or he must first have adequate stock and/or debt basis to claim that deduction. Each shareholder is responsible for tracking her/his own basis. Loss deduction amounts also depend on at-risk and passive activity loss limitations. 

These are just a few of the things to know when operating your business as a Sub S for tax purposes. There are a lot of rules on this topic, so visit https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/s-corporations and the “Related Topics” links on the right to get more details, instructions, forms, and all the other stuff you’ll need. Like I said, electing to operate as a Subchapter S Corporation has some complexities, so make sure you do your homework before getting started. Or think about consulting a qualified tax professional.

Reduce Next Year’s Tax Season Stress


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Rejoice! The 2018 tax filing season is finally over – and with it all the changes from under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. For some taxpayers, it was their first view of how the new tax law impacted them. And it wasn’t always pretty.

Well, how did it go for you? Stressful? Expensive?

If you live in a state with high income taxes or real estate taxes, your usual tax refund may not have come your way this year. On the other hand, the new tax law may have lowered your tax bill. But no matter where you live, seeing the new tax rules in action for 2018 gave you a better idea of what to expect for 2019.

Not knowing what to expect is stressful! Follow these tips to reduce stress next tax season:

Get Organized and Stay Up-to-Date

Use your 2018 tax return to identify the information you’ll need to accumulate during 2019 to prepare for next year. If a life event in 2019, such as buying a home, starting a business, or changing your marital status, you need to check out how it impacts your taxes. Keep up with your tax deductions and other paperwork you’ll need, and the task will be easier to do next year. Plus, if you need pay stubs and account statements to apply for a loan, it’s all ready for you.

Do a “Paycheck Checkup”

Did you owe a lot for 2018, or did you get a refund of the interest-free loan you gave Uncle Sam? An IRS Paycheck Checkup can help to make sure you don’t get an expensive surprise when you file your 2019 income taxes next year. Here’s their online tool to see if you need to change your withholdings https://www.irs.gov/paycheck-checkup Taxpayers with investment, self-employment or other non-wage income need to make quarterly estimated tax payments. Here’s a link to more details https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/estimated-taxes.

Right after you file last year’s taxes is the perfect time to see how to make next tax filing season less stressful. Whether you prepare your own taxes or use a tax professional, following these tips can reduce your stress and reduce the time that you spend filing your 2019 income tax returns.

What to Expect from a Tax Preparer

Changes to the tax law enacted in December 2017 means we’ll be dealing with a lot of new rules this filing season. Tax filing “simplification” means that all the individual forms for 2018 look different than ever before. As a result, more taxpayers than ever before could be looking for a tax preparer, even people who have always filed their own tax returns. But just any tax preparer isn’t good enough, especially this year!

You are responsible for the contents of your tax return, even if you pay someone to prepare and file it for you. It’s essential that you engage a qualified tax preparer who has the right experience and knowledge of your tax situation. The tax industry is unregulated; anyone can hang up her or his “Tax Preparer” shingle. So how do you find a qualified tax preparer to meet your needs?

First, get referrals from colleagues, family and friends about who prepares their taxes. Ask them why they like their tax preparer. Briefly interview two or three of the tax preparers that sound like a good fit, including these three questions:

How Do You Keep Up with Changing Tax Laws?

Tax laws are constantly changing, as we know. It’s important to work with a tax professional who keeps up, so you don’t have to. Your tax preparer should describe attending conferences, webinars, or other methods she or he uses to stay current.

What are Your Experience and Credentials?

Working with a credentialed tax professional, like an Enrolled Agent or Certified Public Accountant, provides confidence that your taxes are being prepared accurately. Also ask for examples of tax situations and complex issues where she or he has experience. The answers will indicate whether your needs will be addressed.

How Do You Communicate with your Clients?

Discuss whether the tax preparer meet regularly with clients, how confidential documents are shared and stored, and whether the person is available for you if a tax-related question or issue comes up outside of “normal” tax season. Make sure you feel comfortable with the tax professional’s style, manner and process.

It’s important to have a qualified tax preparer that is prepared to meet your needs. Feeling confident and comfortable with the answers to these three questions is a good sign that your taxes will be prepared accurately and consider all the new tax rules.

Last Minute Tax Tips for 2018

Less than two weeks left to go before the year ends. Wow! You meant to do some tax planning for 2018. Is it too late now? Believe it or not, there’s still time to implement some planning moves that can improve your tax situation for 2018 and the future.

Here are four last minute tax tips you can jump on and still enjoy the holidays:

Make HSA contributions

If you are an eligible individual under the health savings account (HSA) rules for December 2018, you are treated as having been eligible for the entire year and can make a full year’s deductible contribution for 2018. The maximum contribution provides a deduction of $3,450 for individual coverage and $6,900 for family coverage. Taxpayers age 55 or older also get an additional $1,000 catch-up amount.

Nail down stock losses 

Consider realizing losses for stock you planned to divest anyway. Those losses can offset gains from other stock or investment asset sales. Losses that exceed gains may be deducted up to $3,000, $1,500 for married taxpayers filing separately.

Apply a bunching strategy to deductible contributions and/or payments of medical expenses 

Beginning in 2018, many taxpayers who claimed itemized deductions in prior years will no longer benefit from doing so because the standard deduction has been increased and many itemized deductions have been cut back or abolished. A bunching strategy can help you get around these new limits — by accelerating or deferring discretionary medical expenses and/or charitable contributions into the year where they will do some tax good.

Use IRAs to make charitable gifts 

If you are age 70½ or older, own IRAs, and are thinking of making a charitable gift, consider arranging for the gift to be made by way of a qualified charitable contribution, a direct transfer from the IRA trustee to the charitable organization, up to $100,000. The transferred amount isn’t included in gross income or allowed as a deduction on your tax return. A qualified charitable contribution before year end is a particularly good idea for retired taxpayers who do not need all of their as-yet undistributed required minimum distribution (RMD) for living expenses.

Yes, it’s late in the year for tax planning, but not entirely too late. Implementing one or more of these last minute tax tips will improve your tax situation for 2018 and future years. Makes the holidays even merrier, doesn’t it?

2018 Tax Planning – The New Tax Law Will Impact Your Return

It’s summer! Know what that means? Time at the beach? Sure! Road trip? Absolutely! Summer camp? Well, almost… Summer Camp for Tax Professionals, aka the IRS Tax Forum, just happened here in Washington, DC. It’s perfectly timed between the April and October tax filing deadlines, with a chance to learn about tax trends, changes, and issues from the IRS and experienced tax professionals.

 

Timing was better than ever this year because of all the sessions on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that was passed in December 2017. The 2018 IRS Tax Forum provided details about how the new tax law will impact nearly every household and business in the nation. Tax professionals also got insight on new security and compliance procedures implemented by the IRS, state agencies and tax software vendors to reduce identity theft and fraud.

 

2018 IRS Tax Forum sessions covered a range of updates and issues, including:

 

  • Changes to employer tax withholding tables that do not consider the taxpayer’s specific situation. This could result in an expensive surprise next tax filing season.
  • New qualifying dependent credits and higher income limits for taking dependent and child tax credits. These credits partially offset elimination of personal exemptions.
  • Itemized deduction limits for state-level taxes and mortgage interest.
  • Elimination of moving and miscellaneous itemized deductions.
  • Clarification about eligibility for the new Qualified Business Income deduction for Sub S Corporations and Partnership clients (i.e., pass-through businesses).
  • New requirements for Sub S Corporations and Partnerships to track and report stock and loan basis.
  • Changes to depreciation and expensing rules for business assets.

 

There’s more. Too much for one blog post. Now is a great time for every taxpayer to check into how the new tax law will impact her or his tax bill for 2018. In a few months, it will be too late to make a change.

 

If you’re up for re-visiting your tax projections yourself, there’s plenty of online help. Guidance to project taxable income, tax withholding, deductions and tax liabilities is at the IRS website, https://www.irs.gov/individuals/irs-withholding-calculator for employees and https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/estimated-taxes for business owners.

 

Not sure you want to DIY your taxes? Want help figuring out how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will impact you? Get a referral for a qualified tax professional, preferably one who went to Summer Camp for Tax Professionals, aka the IRS Tax Forum.

Tax Basics for New Business

 

Today, I spoke with my absolute favorite kind of new client – a new business owner who wants to make sure she is covering all her bases when it comes to business taxes. Entrepreneurs who plan and ask for qualified professional advice have a better-than-average chance of meeting their goals.

 

All business owners need to know about taxes. All kinds of taxes: income, employment, sales and use, and property. Plus, if the business has sales or other business activities in more than one state, it has to follow the tax rules for each state. Needless to say, that involves more details than I can fit into this blog.

 

Here are the four basic tax areas that small businesses need to know:

 

  1. Income Tax

Net business income is subject to federal and state income taxes. For sole proprietors, net income is figured on Schedule C, which is part of the IRS Form 1040 for individual tax return. Net income is total business income minus the “reasonable and customary” expenses necessary to operate and sustain the business.

 

  1. Employment Tax

Payroll taxes of 15.3% must be paid on business wages or on net business income from self-employment using Schedule SE on the owner’s return. Non-owner employees must have taxes withheld and remitted to the IRS, state and Social Security Administration. Contractors to whom $600 or more is paid during the year are required to receive IRS Form 1099 to report their earnings.

 

  1. Sales Tax

State taxes are assessed on sales of products and some services, depending on the jurisdiction. Internet and mail order sales are subject to tax depending on the location of the seller and purchaser, and applicable laws. Businesses that operate in more than one jurisdiction, like my new client, must collect, report, and remit taxes in all applicable states.

 

  1. Business Property Tax

Tangible personal property used in a business is subject to property tax, usually collected at the local, or county, level. Taxed property includes furniture, machinery, tools, and all computer and peripheral equipment hardware and all operational software.

 

One business “tax” often overlooked by new businesses is a getting the appropriate business license for each jurisdiction in which it operates. Every business needs to be registered and licensed at the state and local level.

 

I am looking forward to meeting again with my new client next week. Entrepreneurs who plan and get professional advice not only meet their goals – they are fun to help.