Will the IRS Be Ready for the 2019 Tax Season?

Believe it or not, the 2019 tax season is almost here! The Internal Revenue Service has been working for months to be ready to process more than 150 million tax returns that will be filed for the 2018 tax year. Meeting the deadline could be tight — hundreds of forms, instructions, and publications required updating because of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed in December 2017.

We are still waiting to see all the new forms, but the IRS circulated a copy of the new Form 1040 to the tax community not long ago. The new 1040— about half the size of the current version— would replace the “old” Form 1040, Form 1040A and Form 1040EZ. Consolidating the three “old” versions allows all taxpayers to use the same form.

Here’s what you can expect to see on your 2018 individual income tax return:

  1. The new Form 1040 uses a “building block” approach that reduces the return to one simple form that is supplemented with additional schedules if needed. Taxpayers with simple tax situations will only file this new 1040 with no additional schedules.
  2. Several additional new schedules have been developed to supplement the new Form 1040 to report other income, adjustments, credits, and items that appeared on the longer, “old” version of the Form 1040.
  3. The new schedules are designated by numbers instead of letters. Here’s a quick overview of the new schedules and what they are for:
    • Schedule 1 is for taxpayers with additional non–wage sources of income or adjustments to income, such as IRA contributions, student loan interest, and health savings account contributions.
    • Schedule 2 is for taxpayers with additional taxes, such as alternative minimum tax or excess advance premium tax credit repayment.
    • Schedule 3 is for nonrefundable tax credits such as the foreign tax credit, education credits or residential energy credit.
    • Schedule 4 is where taxpayers will add up certain taxes, such as self-employment tax, and household employment taxes.
    • Schedule 5 is to add up tax payments, such as estimated tax payments or amounts paid with an extension.
    • Schedule 6 is used to report a foreign address or appoint a third-party designee to discuss the tax return with the IRS on your behalf.

Will the IRS be ready for the 2019 tax filing season? If changes to the Form 1040 are any indication, it could be a tight dash to the deadline. Have questions? Check out www.irs.gov or call your tax professional.