Tips for Nonprofits during Giving Season

Thanksgiving is the traditional start of Giving Season. To mark the date, I blogged a couple of weeks ago about “Which, Who, What, and How” individuals can deduct charitable donations. Nonprofits receive a large portion of their total donations in the last few weeks of the year. Large donation volumes require protections to prevent some of those funds from “disappearing”.

 

Nonprofits work hard to raise funds. Plus, they have fiduciary responsibility for donor funds, starting when they are received. So, in the spirit of equal time, this week’s blog gives some tips to nonprofits, similar to tips that I gave in November to taxpayers planning to make year-end donations.

 

Four best practices for nonprofits to protect their donations:

 

  1. Segregate Duties

Separate tasks to ensure that funds are protected at all times, and nothing “falls through the cracks”. For example, separate the tasks for receiving and depositing funds. Bank account reconciliations and other verification procedures should be performed by someone who is not involved in receiving or depositing funds.

 

  1. Standardize and Automate

Establish and follow a routine process for each donation method. Define non-routine activity, how to detect it, and how to address it. Investing in automation generally reduces overall cost through efficiency and cost-effective controls. Automation facilitates reporting to track activity and detect/address issues and anomalies.

 

  1. Verify and Reconcile

Independent and regular donation verification is one of the most important protections for your donations. Automated tools are available for bank account and credit card reconciliations. Up-front technology investments generally pay for themselves quickly. Donations that are restricted by the donor for a specific purpose should be verified separately.

 

  1. Manage Donation Channels

All donations should be protected. Priority should be given to donation channels that bring in the largest dollar amounts. Identify your donation channels, such as direct mail, online, events, or walk-ins. Determine the dollar amount and donation volume from each channel. Prioritize protection activities on donation channels that bring in the larger percentages of total dollars. Encourage donors to use less expensive, well-protected donation channels.

 

Following these best practices is not everything nonprofits should do to protect donations, but it’s a start.  What is your nonprofit doing to make sure that your donations are protected?