Preventing Fraud

It’s been over six months since I last blogged about fraud risk in small businesses and nonprofits. Tax season and the new tax law must have distracted me. But fraud has not stopped lurking, robbing organizations of their hard-earned funds.

In case you forgot, fraud is an illegal act involving deceit, concealment, or a violation of trust. Fraud doesn’t involve physical threats of violence or force. Fraud is committed to obtain money, property, or services; to avoid payment or loss of services; or to secure personal or business advantage.

Fraud is not unique to any one type of organization. The opportunity to commit fraud exists everywhere, including public and private businesses and nonprofits. Small businesses and nonprofits are even more susceptible to fraud because of typically lower levels of staffing and technology. Plus, the environment at nonprofits and small businesses espouses trust that could be exploited by people who are unscrupulous or experiencing extreme financial pressures.

First — recognize that fraud can happen. Second — implement an action plan to help prevent fraud from happening. How? Minimize the chances that fraud will happen at your organization with these three tips:

  • Separate Tasks – The most powerful weapon against fraud is separating tasks or duties that should not be performed by the same person, like separating expense approval and payment from the person who reconciles the bank account. Separating duties prevents one person from having too much control over financial activities so that she or he could take funds without detection.
  • Investigate Anomalies – Identify anomalies, or exceptions, from expected conditions or results. Is your cash flow within a normal expected range? Are your sales returns higher than usual? Investigate performance and results that fall outside the expected range and take action. Looking into unusual activity could draw attention to and end fraudulent activities. Even if no fraud has occurred, you can take corrective action as needed.
  • Independent Monitoring – Periodic independent monitoring by a knowledgeable party is another way to safeguard financial assets. Methods include supervisor reviews, periodic audits and effective governance. Exception reports or anomalies should ideally be investigated by someone who is independent of the original activity. Nonprofits with limited staff can involve the Board Treasurer in the monitoring process.

Important steps for preventing fraud are to recognize that fraud can happen and to implement an action plan to mitigate the risk of loss. Powerful weapons like separating tasks, investigating anomalies and independent monitoring all reduce the risk of losing money, property, services or reputation. Trust is great; implementing fraud prevention tips is priceless.