Taxes and Your Subchapter S Corporation

Whenever I get a “run” of client calls about a specific topic, I assume that the Tax Universe is telling me to blog about it. Lately, that topic has been the tax rules for business owners who have elected to operate as a Subchapter S Corporation (Sub S). Business owners often form an LLC to protect their personal assets. An LLC can be operated for tax purposes in one of several ways, including the election to operate for tax purposes as a Sub S. That election has some advantages, but it adds more complexity as well.

If your business operates for tax purposes as a Sub S, or you are thinking about forming one, here are a few things to know:

  • Qualification – To qualify for Sub S status, the business must be a corporation that has between one and 100 shareholders who are domestic individuals, certain trusts, or estates. A Sub S can only have one class of stock. The corporation must have legal formation documents, an operating agreement, a separate tax ID, and documented shareholder meetings. 
  • Avoid Double Taxation – Sub S Corporations pass corporate income, losses, deductions, and credits through to their shareholders for tax purposes. However, there are a few exceptions when a Sub S is responsible for tax, such as built-in gains and passive income. Shareholders of a Sub S report their pro rata share of income and losses on their personal tax returns, subject to tax at the shareholder’s individual income tax rates. 
  • Shareholder Compensation – Sub S Corporations must pay reasonable compensation in the form of wages to a shareholder-employee if that the employee provides services to the corporation. Wages are reported on a W-2 and are subject to employment taxes. Net profits or losses from operations are reported on a Form K-1 and treated as non-wage distributions, which are not subject to employment taxes. 
  • Limited Losses – The fact that a shareholder receives a K-1 reflecting a loss does not mean that the shareholder is automatically entitled to deduct the loss. She or he must first have adequate stock and/or debt basis to claim that deduction. Each shareholder is responsible for tracking her/his own basis. Loss deduction amounts also depend on at-risk and passive activity loss limitations. 

These are just a few of the things to know when operating your business as a Sub S for tax purposes. There are a lot of rules on this topic, so visit https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/s-corporations and the “Related Topics” links on the right to get more details, instructions, forms, and all the other stuff you’ll need. Like I said, electing to operate as a Subchapter S Corporation has some complexities, so make sure you do your homework before getting started. Or think about consulting a qualified tax professional.